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Posted on Dec 12, 2016 in Articles |

Writing a will – some help getting started

It’s easy to put off writing a will. We all have excuses – ‘I’m still young’ (this body is impermanent), ‘I don’t have anything of value’ (most people are surprised by what their seemingly meagre assets add up to), ‘I’m sure it’ll all be taken care of by my family’ (leaving it up to friends and family to sort out after your death can be complicated and stressful). Writing a will can be easier than you think. Here is a brief guide to getting started. Writing a Will Part 1: Where to Start? Download the Will Planner on our website. First up – figuring out what you have to give. Home, savings, car, pension are often the main things on people’s list. Other things to consider are stocks and shares, insurance and any valuable items. Then comes the less pleasant part – figuring out what you have to owe: outstanding mortgage, loans or overdrafts are often the major considerations. Hopefully you now feel a bit lighter for having taken...

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Posted on Oct 18, 2016 in Videos |

Just Ask. Just Give.

Just Ask. Just Give.

Why do people support the Abhayaratna Trust and who benefits? Grateful thanks to Shantiketu for making this video.

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Posted on Sep 13, 2016 in News |

A Beginner’s Guide to Wills

At last year’s Triratna International Combined Convention the Abhayaratna Trust welcomed 24 people to our ‘Wills Café’. Some wondered who Will was, with one attendee expected a discussion on Shakespeare, but everyone seemed to appreciate Satyadasa from Greengate Wills introducing will writing and answering all kinds of questions – from what is probate to where should one store a will, and writing wills to cover owned property abroad. Listen in...

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Posted on Jul 11, 2016 in News |

Performance: Heart of the Sorrow

At the area Order weekend in August at Ahisathana, Satyadaka and I put on a performance of Heart of the Sorrow on behalf of the Abhayaratna Trust; a song cycle on the myth of Orpheus, with narrative and some of Rilke’s Sonnets to Orpheus woven in, that emerged after I came across a fully strung harp that was abandoned and rotting on a pavement in Glasgow. Satyadaka read from his own translations of Rilke and played some lead guitar on Eurydice’s Death Song, with Satyalila on tambourine. The songs and narrative are a re-interpretation of the myth, relating the story of Orpheus and his attempt to recover his bride Eurydice from the Underworld; the need for him to turn and face the impermanent and ungraspable nature of all things and find an opening of the heart that leads beyond sorrow. Ninety seven people attended the performance, some people told me they were moved to tears, which was pleasing to hear, as it suggested that we had managed to communicate something of...

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